Providing Emotional Support For Your Animal

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WNC’s holistic vet, Dr. Laurel Davis offers “Stories from a holistic vet.” It is the blog of a holistic vet and “animal interpreter” with a clinic in Asheville, NC. Dr. Laurel also offers intuitive animal health, vaccination and lifestyle advice for animal companions and their human friends across the USA.

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Upcoming Vet Visit? Provide Emotional Support for Your Dog or Cat

emotional support
Sunvet Animal Wellness Client Jane Northway and her beautiful friend Lolli in our Asheville, NC clinic

An online reader expressed the concerns of many animal lovers regarding their sweet companions and how stressful it is sometimes for them to visit their veterinarian. Although we create a very gentle environment for our animals here in our Asheville NC clinic, not every animal hospital or vet clinic is as welcoming. For some patients, walking in the front door of the animal hospital is all it takes to bring on the shakes, shivers, and — let’s not forget — the incessant panting. What can you do to help your dog or cat chill out and feel comfortable on these trips? 

My list below is based on my understanding and that of many of my clients that we truly do communicate with our furry friends. We can intentionally make a connection and send a message to our four-legged friends to give them the information and comfort they need to better cope with their perceived and actual stresses as they visit their veterinarian. Here are a few ideas to help you master your ‘one on one’ conversations with Belle or Butch related to veterinary visits.

1.  Visualize walking in the front door of the veterinary clinic and being greeted by smiling faces, positive energy, friendly eyes. Assure your companion that all who will be handling him will be gentle and have his best interests at heart. 

2.  If she is going in for a specific procedure, find out what the procedure entails, then visualize all that will possibly be happening while your buddy is conscious. You have permission to be deliberately creative and imaginative about your visual narrative. Include a cast of characters that will handle her with confidence and love and who will complete the procedure(s) swiftly and with kindness. When the procedures are finished, she will be closer to walking out the door with you.

3.  If she is going to be there overnight you can visualize a day/night, or light/dark cycle to give her a heads-up that she will not be leaving immediately but her exit is in sight. You most certainly can use this same connection technique to talk with her during an overnight stay. At this time, you can visualize any loving touch that means a lot to her. Talk to her about how your day went and send her your love. You can read more about connecting with your animal from a distance here.

4.  Let them know the procedure is to gather information, such as a blood draw for a simple heartworm test, or a pre-surgical blood scan to make sure they are okay to go under anesthesia, or let them know the procedure is to alleviate a problem, such as anal gland expression, examining a cut on a leg, or taking a growth from under their front leg so they can walk with more ease. 

5.  Visualize her walking out of the clinic with you.  This is an important and essential piece of information.  Every animal wants to know they will be leaving the veterinary hospital with their people.

I am hoping these suggestions will help to lighten the stress as you plan for your next veterinary visit.  As we move further into the understanding that our beautiful, loving companions are more aware than we could ever have imagined, we open ourselves to intentional and authentic interspecies kinship and heart connection.

Shine on,

Dr. Laurel

drlaureldavis-with-bee-cat-vaccination

Dr. Laurel Davis is a holistic Asheville vet offering phone and Skype consultations for animal lovers everywhere.Call 828-254-2221 or order an Ask Dr. Laurel™ phone or Skype session or bring your dog or cat to her downtown Asheville, NC clinic.Read more patient stories.

Get to know Dr. Laurel by reading her blog.

Do you have a story about Dr. Laurel’s dog advice or how she helped your animal companion? Please leave it in the comments below or write a Google Review.

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3 Responses to “Providing Emotional Support For Your Animal”

  1. Barrie Rissman

    Your suggestions are all wonderful. I wish more vets would not take animals out of the exam room and into the back for routine procedures such as blood draws, away from the one person they most trust and whose presence is most comforting and reassuring them.

    Reply
  2. Barrie Rissman

    Your suggestions are all wonderful. I wish more vets would not take animals out of the exam room and into the back for routine procedures such as blood draws, away from the one person they most trust and whose presence is most comforting and reassuring to them.

    Reply

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