Stories from a holistic vet: So far, but yet so close – learn to say “hello” to your animal companion from afar

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At least once a week, I hear an animal ask me, “Please tell my people how to send me messages when they are away.”  A simple “hello” from afar can make a stay at a kennel or a lonely stay at your home more bearable.

 

Dr. Laurel Davis, Asheville’s natural vet, offers Stories from a Holistic Veterinarian, the blog of a holistic vet and “animal interpreter.” With a clinic in downtown Asheville, NC. Dr. Laurel also offers animal health, lifestyle and vaccination advice for cats, dogs and their human friends across the country.
Have a question for Dr. Laurel? Send it in.

Want comprehensive or detailed dog or cat advice? Schedule an Ask Dr. Laurel™ phone or Skype consultation.

 

Asheville's Natural Vet
Be open to receiving any messages from your friend. After spending some time, let her know you’re signing off, but that you’re safe and supportive, even from where you are.

Stories from a holistic vet: So far, but yet so close

When you are away from your pup, whether it’s at your place of work or on a two-week vacation to Belize, you can spend some time with your four-legged buddy even though she is back in your hometown. I’m a holistic vet and also an “animal interpreter,” and at least once a week, I hear an animal ask me, “Please tell my people how to send me messages when they are away.”  A simple “hello” from afar can make a stay at a kennel or a lonely stay at your home more bearable.

How to contact your lonely canine:

Get quiet. This can mean sitting quietly or, if you can keep from falling asleep, you can do this just as you lay down in your bed at night. Most importantly, create a space so you have minimal or, even better, no distractions.

Close your eyes.

Take 3 deep, slow breaths, breathing each all the way down into your belly.

Say your doggy pal’s name three times out loud or just quietly within yourself.

Wait for a image of your buddy to appear in your mind’s eye.

When an image appears, this is the time to trust you are truly in connection with your furry partner. You may have a mental picture of her head or whole body, or this vision may roll into a motion picture effect with action. You may have a change in your emotions. You may even have new words or thoughts enter your head. The journey for each person is different.

Spend whatever amount of time you want to talking out loud or in your head to your Sweetie Pie.

Save time to remain quiet at the end. Be open to receiving any messages from your friend. After spending some time, let her know you’re signing off, but that you’re safe and supportive, even from where you are.

Trust that this is a true communication! And so it is.

As an additional way to help your dog adjust, try this essential oil combination. You can ask your furry friend’s caretaker to add this mix to an aromatherapy diffuser, and see if it seems to calm your friend. If not, cease and desist; however, for many dogs, this scent-remedy can be a real help. Please only use true essential oils.

Calming Blend for Times When We’re Apart

8 to 10 drops of Sweet Orange (Citrus Sinensis)

4 to 6 drops of Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

4 to o 6 drops of Ylang Ylang (Cananga odorata)

Mix these oil into a carrier base and add to diffuser or ask your caretaker to use this blend for a topical massage on your furry friend’s back and legs.

Carrier Base For Essential Oil Blends: Two ounces jojoba (Simmonsdia chinensis) OR Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis) gel OR Lavender Hydrosol (Lavandula angustifolia) for a spray mist

Want to know more? Click here to read another of my posts about the ins and outs of separation anxiety,

Shine on,

Dr. Laurel

 

Asheville's Natural Vet

 

Dr. Laurel Davis is western NC’s natural vet, offering phone and Skype consultations for animal lovers everywhere. Call 828-254-2221 or order an Ask Dr. Laurel™ phone or Skype session or bring your dog or cat to her downtown Asheville, NC clinicRead more patient stories.

Get to know Dr. Laurel by reading her blog.

Do you have a story about Dr. Laurel’s dog advice or how she helped your dog or cat? Please leave it in the comments below or write a Google Review.

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4 Responses to “Stories from a holistic vet: So far, but yet so close – learn to say “hello” to your animal companion from afar”

  1. sandra

    My 5 yr old westie us very finicky with food, never interested. How do I know what does he wants to eat??????? THANKS

    Reply
    • relationships

      Hi Sandra – I checked with Dr. Laurel about your Westie, and she recommends a 45 minute consultation to help with this. If you want to schedule one, you can call the office at 828-254-2221 or order online here: http://bit.ly/sunvetcheckin

      Thanks again for your interest!

      Reply
  2. relationships

    Hi Sandra – Thank you for contacting us. Dr. Laurel would be glad to help you with discovering the best food for your Westie. With her many years’ experience in both conventional and holistic medicine and nutrition for animals, she can ask you a few questions and then ‘tune in’ to your dog to give specific recommendations.

    She can usually give her phone and Skype clients some strong recommendations within one session. Interested in booking a Skype session with her? Please call our office at 828-254-2221 or order a session online on our website at http://bit.ly/sunvetcheckins . If you have any problems, please let me know at relationships [at] sunvetanimalwellness.com .

    Thank you,
    Erin Everett, online manager

    Reply
  3. Zach

    I work all day long and am even out of town on some weeks working.
    My pup has separation anxiety and tears everything she can up when I’m not around.
    How can I get her to learn not to?
    I took her in from being neglected on the streets. I can’t just get rid of her.

    Reply

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